Nov 30, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Numbering System

Courses are numbered as follows to indicate levels of difficulty and degrees of specialization:

  1000 series courses, for the most part, cover a wide range of material and serve as introductions to a particular discipline. Generally appropriate for first-year students.
  2000 series courses are more specific in focus than 1000 series; they may require some previous knowledge of a subject. Generally appropriate for sophomores.
  3000 series courses are clearly upper-level courses that require significant background in a field and may have specific prerequisites. Generally appropriate for juniors and seniors.
  4000 series courses require extensive background in a field and usually have prerequisites. Generally appropriate for juniors and seniors.
 

Education

  
  •  

    EDU 3124 - Young Adolescents: Preparing to Teach in the Middle Level


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Prepares prospective teachers to develop a comprehensive understanding of the development of young adolescents. Attention will focus on the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral characteristics and risk behaviors of young adolescents as expressed in both social and school contexts. This understanding becomes part of a rationale for and the function of middle-level philosophy. Prospective teachers will develop an understanding of their roles as middle-level teachers, coaches, mentors, sponsors, and guides who understand and can facilitate healthy growth and development of young adolescents. They will also develop an understanding of the design of appropriate middle school learning environments including flexible grouping and scheduling, teacher-based guidance programs, electives, exploratory experiences, clubs, community service, and work with families. Requires 10 field hours.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Education program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3134 - Creating Middle-Level Learning Experiences


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Focuses on preparing prospective teachers to create interactive middle-level learning experiences that are developmentally and culturally responsive. Prospective teachers will develop instruction that incorporates a recognition of individual learning differences by utilizing multiple approaches to thinking and learning. Requires 10 field hours.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Education program or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3204 - Philosophy of Education


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as PHIL 3204 .
    Examines recurring philosophic questions related to the nature and purposes of knowledge and formal education systems through the study of classic and contemporary philosophic texts. Educational theories, curriculum matters, and other schooling controversies will be analyzed in light of the disparate philosophic theories. The question of what it means to be an educated person will be the focus of the course.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2014 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3244 - Practicum in Learning Experiences


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Designed for students to gain actual classroom experience by planning, organizing, developing, delivering, and assessing instruction in the grade level(s) of their certification. When possible, teaching segments will be videotaped, and students will be evaluated by cooperating classroom teachers and the college supervisor. Students will spend three weeks of full-day teaching in the classroom with on-campus seminars before, during, and after the three-week experience. Students should enroll in this course during May term of their junior year. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Education program and junior standing
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3294 - Special Topics in Education


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Advanced study of a topic or area of inquiry that has not been treated fully in other education courses. Topics may be based in educational theory, philosophy, history, or practice. They may also be related to an examination of a current trend or philosophical world view that has direct impact on the discipline of education or may reflect timely research trends within the field of education. Travel courses that involve a study of comparative education or other relevant topics may be included. Topics will vary and will be announced in advance. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 2014  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3314 - Readings in Peace Education


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as IDS 3314 .
    A study of peace from a variety of disciplinary viewpoints. Readings and other materials encourage students to question the rationale(s) for war and analyze arguments made for solving conflicts in ways that promote peace. Theories and definitions related to violence, nonviolence, war, and pacifism, as well as positive and negative peace will be explored. The theoretical emphasis of the course focuses on the carving out of appropriate epistemologies that develop an education for peace.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3414 - Race, Ethnicity, and Social Class in American Education


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Examines American education within the broader scope of race, ethnicity, and social class. Success in American society is influenced by racial, ethnic, and/or social class status. Students will examine how such status differences manifest themselves within American public education—an institution purported to provide equal opportunity regardless of race, ethnicity, and/or social class. Other issues addressed are identity development of culturally diverse children, the impact of poverty on education, school funding, tracking, culturally relevant teaching, and how standard school practices influence students from historically underrepresented populations.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Area II Social Science, EDU 2014  and FYS 1104 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3424 - Women in Education


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WGS 3424 .
    Examines the impact of women on philosophical foundations in the field of education and the subtle forms of sexism that undermine the education of girls and young women in current educational contexts. Students will examine work of historical and contemporary women philosophers to understand their unique contributions to the field of education. Students will also examine developmental needs of girls and current research on gender inequities within schools.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Area II Social Science, EDU 2014  and FYS 1104 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 3434 - Art Pedagogy


    1 Course Unit(s)
    This P-12 school-based course provides an opportunity for the art education student to collaborate with an in-service art teacher to design and implement instruction. A bi-weekly meeting with the college supervisor allows time for discussion of theories that ground art pedagogy. A minimum of three hours per week must be spent at the P-12 school. A portfolio of age-appropriate art activities is required.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education program, sophomore or junior standing, and completion of EDU 2164  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4012 - Independent Study


    1/2 Course Unit(s)
    Intensive study, through research and/or internship, of an educational issue or of special educational techniques and programs.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4014 - Independent Study


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Intensive study, through research and/or internship, of an educational issue or of special educational techniques and programs.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4114 - Supervised Teaching in High School


    4 Course Unit(s)
    Open to seniors who are meeting requirements for a teacher’s certificate in secondary education. Includes seminar. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, recommendation of major department, admission to Teacher Education program, 275 grade point average in major(s) and minor(s), 275 grade point average in professional education courses, an overall grade point average of 275, and approval of Teacher Education Advisory Board
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4204 - Internship in Educational Studies


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Supervised placement of students in education-related organizations or agencies that provide students with the opportunity to apply information from their courses in a practical context. Students choose an appropriate organization or agency in consultation with a faculty member. A total of 1 course unit may be counted toward major requirements. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, educational studies major, and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4214 - Supervised Teaching in Elementary School


    4 Course Unit(s)
    Open to seniors who are meeting requirements for a teacher’s certificate in grades K-4. Includes seminar. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, departmental recommendation, admission to Teacher Education Program, 275 grade point average in an area of emphasis (fine arts and humanities for students using core requirements for completion of an approved area of emphasis), 275 grade point average in professional education courses, an overall grade point average of 275, and approval of Teacher Education Advisory Board
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4314 - Supervised Teaching: Twelve Grades


    4 Course Unit(s)
    Open to seniors who are meeting requirements for teacher certification for 12 grades in art, music, French, or Spanish. Includes seminar. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, recommendation of major department, admission to Teacher Education program, 275 grade point average in major(s) and minor(s), 275 grade point average in professional education courses, an overall grade point average of 275, and approval of Teacher Education Advisory Board
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4414 - Supervised Teaching: Middle Grades 5-8


    4 Course Unit(s)
    Open to seniors who are meeting requirements for teacher certification for middle grades 5-8. Includes seminar. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, departmental recommendation, admission to the Teacher Education program, 275 grade point average in both areas of emphasis, 275 grade point average in professional education courses, an overall grade point average of 275, and approval of Teacher Education Advisory Board
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    EDU 4514 - Senior Seminar


    1 Course Unit(s)
    The senior capstone for education and educational studies majors is designed to engage students of the discipline in a topical theme that explores the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching and learning. Students will experience a topic in education through selected readings, discussion, writing assignments, and/or special projects. Topic will change year to year and by instructor and could involve a travel component.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): senior standing and education or educational studies major, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None

English

  
  •  

    ENG 1074 - Introduction to Literary Genres


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introductory course in literature designed to guide students’ critical thinking about literary works of various kinds—prose, fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will be given practice in discerning the distinctive features of individual texts while developing their sense of literature’s role in cultural life. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 1124 - Introduction to Dramatic Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as THEA 1124 .
    An introduction to the study of dramatic literature. Students will practice critical reading and writing about the major periods and genres of world dramatic literature, from the Greeks to the present. They will also be expected to see 2-3 plays performed locally.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 1134 - Introduction to Poetry


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introduction to the study of poetry as a verbal art. Students will focus intensely on language and the ways in which poems develop meaning through a complex patterning of linguistic features. Students will also be guided in thinking of poetry’s value in cultural life. Not a creative writing course. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 1144 - Introduction to Fiction


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introductory course in prose fiction that focuses on the short story as a form, but may also include a novel or two in its syllabus. Students will practice discerning the distinctive features of individual texts, while developing their sense of narrative fiction’s contributions to cultural life. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 1194 - Introduction to Film


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of film as a major contemporary art form. Topics include film technique and aesthetics, the history of motion pictures, and genres. At least one film viewing each week.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 1514 - Readings for Creative Writers


    1 Course Unit(s)
    the writer’s craft. This course is an apprenticeship in which the skills that go into the composition of an exemplary work of literature are identified, discussed, and, finally, practiced by the student.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Humanities
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2004 - Studies in Fiction


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of short fiction and novel-length works by selected writers primarily from the English-speaking world. Examines the intellectual and cultural backgrounds of these selected works of fiction and develops a comprehensive understanding of the literary techniques through which the fiction writer shapes his/her work. Authors studied may include Flannery O’Connor, James Baldwin, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Margaret Atwood, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2064 - Non-Fiction Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introductory study of the conventions that shape literary non-fiction with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2074 - Fiction Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WRC 2074 .
    An introductory study of the conventions that shape fiction combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2084 - Poetry Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WRC 2084 .
    An introductory study of the conventions that shape lyric poetry combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2102 - Creative Writing Service


    1/2 Course Unit(s)
    This service course is required for students pursuing a creative writing minor. This course is intended to encourage students to share the responsibility of nurturing a healthy literary and artistic culture on campus. Students may receive credit through a variety of means: serving on the staff of the literary magazine, organizing campus readings or open-mic events, or by organizing clubs or collaborations among artists. Must be approved by program director. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2124 - Introduction to African Fiction


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introduction to African literature from Anglophone (English-speaking) countries. The course will focus on clarifying forms of narration that attract African writers as well as issues such as the place of intellectuals and narrative art within contemporary African cultures, language and audience, language and politics, and tradition and modernity. The course will be supported by journalistic and video material, as well as series of feature films by African directors. Works studied will be by Achebe, Emecheta, Nhuhi, Dangarembga, Ata Aidoo, Ogot, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): III A or IV
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2134 - American Writing of Nature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the ways in which recent American writers represent nature and of the meaning and viability of an ecological culture. The course will allow students to become aware of how literature (essays, fiction, poetry) explores different ways of naming our relation to the land, to other life forms, and, of course, to other humans. Among the writers studied are Barry Lopez, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gary Snyder, and Denise Levertov.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2144 - Women’s Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WGS 2144 .
    A survey of major issues in the study of women in literature, covering a representative sample of women writers. Questions will be raised about the nature and effects of patriarchal thinking on women and women writers, the ways in which women’s problems emerge in women’s writing, and the ways in which women writers image reality.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): At least one ENG course and FYS 1104 . WGS 1004  is recommended preparation
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2154 - American Women Writers and Ethnicity


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WGS 2154 .
    A study of prose and poetry written by women in America: African-American, Asian, Chicana, American Indian, and West and East Indian. The course will focus on questions raised about historicity, race, class, and gender, and the function of writing in addressing such social dynamics. Beyond this inquiry, the course will address issues related to compound identities and communities, class position and education, the construction of sexuality, the formation of collective ethnic or racial consciousness, and women’s communities. Writers may include Hurston, Larsen, Morrison, Kingston, Erdrich, Andalzua, Muhkerjee, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): FYS 1104 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2164 - Twentieth-Century African American Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of African American writing that explores the portrayal of urban experience following the Great Migration. The class will read fiction, drama, and non-fiction narratives, listen to jazz, and watch films in order to examine how race, class, and gender shape life in American cities and how literary representation has changed historically. Writers may include Charles Chesnutt, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Gwendolyn Brooks, Paule Marshall, Amiri Baraka, and Toni Morrison.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2174 - Popular Fictions


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introduction to the critical study of popular culture. Texts will be selected from a variety of media (print, film, television, comic books, etc.) so as to open questions of genre (detective, romance, thriller, etc.). The critical contexts will provide students with the opportunity to investigate the cultural and political implications of popular forms and to consider the role of popular fiction in contemporary life. Media and genres considered may change from term to term.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2184 - Literature of the American South


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of selected fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction by Southern writers. The course will address ways in which these writers both reflect and create what have come to be considered cultural realities about the region, the relationship between the history of the area and its literature, and the continued existence of the South as a distinctive region within the United States. Writers may include Jefferson, Poe, Twain, Chesnutt, Chopin, the Nashville Agrarians, Hurston, Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, O’Connor, Welty, Gaines, Walker, and Allison.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): FYS 1104 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2264 - Non-Fiction Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WRC 2264 .
    An introductory study of the conventions that shape literary non-fiction with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2284 - South African Fiction, 1960-1994


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of South African fiction written between 1960 and the first fully democratic elections of 1994. The course includes some of the key issues addressed by writers such as J. M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Bessie Head, Alex La Guma, and Njabulo Ndebele as they lived through the effects of apartheid. Guiding this exploration will be an awareness of developments in the new South Africa as it seeks to come to terms with the violence and racialism of its past. Inclusion of journalistic and video material will provide assistance in understanding the relevant historical and social contexts.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2294 - Special Topics in Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Study of an author, period, or problem not fully treated in other English courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2344 - The Culture of Nature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of ways in which popular culture in the U.S. shapes assumptions about nature. The course provides students with a critical language designed to illuminate cultural products in a variety of media (print, film, television, etc.) as well as those aspects of daily life which communicate ideas of nature implicitly. This course will treat a range of topics in relation to environmental concerns, including, for example, gender, wilderness, food, tourism, labor, and the sciences.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2374 - Postmodern Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of literature after 1945 that reflects a postmodern consideration of language as a means to cultural criticism. The course will examine how writers, by focusing on language, experiment with form narrative, dramatic, and poetic. The literature embodies varieties of cultural criticism, including feminist and postcolonial; may include such writers as Donald Barthelme, Italo Calvino, Derek Walcott, Angela Carter, Salman Rushdie, M. M. Coetzee, and Caryl Phillips.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): FYS 1104 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2474 - Survey of British Literature I


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of great British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Restoration. Included are such figures as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, and Donne.

    General Education Requirement(s): III B or IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing, completion of one ENG Area II course, or permission of instructor and FYS 1104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2484 - Survey of British Literature II


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A survey of important British literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present that examines ways in which literary artists both adapted to and reproduced the cultural changes associated with modernity while dealing with modernity’s evolving social and political circumstances. The course will explore a complex cultural tradition in its social context and will include such writers as Addison, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Dickens, Hardy, Woolf, and Hughes. May be used to satisfy a distribution requirement in Western tradition.

    General Education Requirement(s): III B or IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing, completion of one English Area II course, or permission of instructor and FYS 1104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2504 - Studies in Film


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Study of an auteur or group of auteurs, or of film genres, stylistic, or historical questions not treated fully in Introduction to Film. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit if genre is different.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): FYS 1104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2514 - Genre Film


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Addresses the complex question of genre in cinema, investigating the ways in which narrative forms are infused with and transmit culturally specific mythic and ideological meanings. It will examine what constitutes cinematic genre in general, and then consider the developing histories of such genres as the Western, the gangster film, horror, science fiction, etc., as reflected by particular texts.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2534 - Detective Fiction


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the generic dimensions and directions of detective fiction from Poe to the present. It will investigate the hold detective fiction has had on the popular imagination and the genre’s reinforcement or subversion of ideological assumptions. Writers and filmmakers may include Doyle, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, Paretsky, Hillerman, Himes, Dmytryk, Huston, Polanski, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): FYS 1104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2614 - American Short Story


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the genre of the short story as conceived and crafted by American writers. The course will consider the nature and history of the short story, its development in America, its early American practitioners and theorists, and how American short fiction reflects and comments on American life and culture. May include the work of Poe, Hawthorne, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Baldwin, O’Connor, Paley, Oates, Lahiri, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2624 - American Gothic


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the genre of American Gothic fiction and how it evolved from the late eighteenth century through the early twenty-first century. The course will examine the origins of American Gothic fiction and the genre’s development at various periods and in different regions. It will explore the sometimes painful birth of American literature and consider the continued fascination with what Herman Melville called the “power of blackness.”

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2654 - Fictions of Identity in American Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of American literature in relation to the phenomenon of “passing,” exploring the complex connections among race, gender, class, and power. The primary readings will be supported by an examination of legal essays, ethnographic studies, and films that develop 3534a context for understanding how Americans culturally and legally defined as “black” took on “white” identity and how “passing” now extends to class, ethnic, and sexual identities. Writers may include James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, Americo Paredes, and Danzy Senna.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2674 - Survey of American Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An exploration of the social forces shaping American literature from 1492 to the present. We will consider how our literature chronicles the emergence of uniquely American voices and stories, and we will analyze the formation of a canon of “important” literature and the ways that canon has been challenged. Most importantly, we will keep asking how the literature of the United States simultaneously contests and reinforces the evolving cultural and political concerns of American culture.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing and completion of one English Area II course, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 2714 - Jane Austen and Film


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WGS 2714 .
    Examines what Jane Austen’s novels and their film adaptations reveal about both Regency England and the contemporary world. The course explores the novels in their original cultural contexts and asks how these novels speak to the interests, desires, and problems of today’s culture. Students will read in detail four of Austen’s novels and discuss the efforts of twentieth-century filmmakers to capture, edit, and update Austen’s humor and wit for today’s audiences.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3014 - Special Topics in Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Advanced study of an author, period, or topic not fully treated in other English courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3024 - Chaucer


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A close reading of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and selected shorter works within the cultural context of fourteenth-century England. The seminar will examine literary, political, social, religious, and philosophical issues central to an understanding of Chaucer as both a reflection and a critique of his times and as someone who anticipates contemporary issues. Read in Middle English.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3074 - Advanced Fiction Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An advanced and in-depth study of the conventions that shape literary fiction with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussions of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2074 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3084 - Advanced Poetry Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An advanced and in-depth study of the conventions that shape poetry with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussions of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2084  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3164 - Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An advanced, in-depth study of the conventions that shape literary non-fiction with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2164 
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3174 - Nineteenth-Century American Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of major writers focusing on the emergence of an American consciousness. Emphasis on Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Crane, Dickinson, Whitman, and James.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3204 - The Romantic Lyric


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the lyric as it was transformed by British Romantics into a vehicle for sustained introspection and psychological analysis. The course explores the ethical and political dimensions of these aesthetic developments and situates them within a history of revolutions—British, American, and French. Authors may include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, the Shelleys, Keats, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3224 - Romanticism and Liberty


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of major British writers from the Romantic period, with some attention to Continental developments of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Authors may include Blake, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Shelleys, Byron, Keats, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3234 - Victorian Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of British literature from 1832 to the end of the century dealing with poetry and prose of such writers as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Dickens, Eliot, Ruskin, Hardy, and others.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3304 - Seventeenth-Century British Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of major writers of the seventeenth century: Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Jonson, Milton, Bacon, Burton, Browne, Webster, Tourneur, Middleton, etc. Emphasizes intellectual and literary currents in the period as seen in selected prose and examines trends in drama and lyric poetry after Shakespeare. Generic focus may vary from year to year.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3314 - Renaissance Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of major writers of the Continental and English Renaissance: Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and other sixteenth-century poets and playwrights. Emphasis on intellectual and cultural backgrounds to the literature.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3324 - Shakespeare I


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as THEA 3324 .
    An intensive study of 8-10 plays drawn from the first half of Shakespeare’s career, dealing with selected histories, comedies, and tragedies up to about 1600.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3334 - Shakespeare II


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as THEA 3334 .
    An intensive study of at least 10 plays from the second half of Shakespeare’s career, dealing with the problem comedies, mature tragedies, and tragicomedies.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3404 - Early Twentieth-Century British Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of British literature from the turn of the century to World War II. Most of the course will be devoted to the development of Modernism, but predecessors and successors will also be considered. Writers such as Hardy, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Rhys, and Woolf will be included.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3414 - Twentieth-Century British Literature, Post-1945


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of British literature written after World War II. The designation “British” will include not only authors born in England, but also authors from the former British colonies writing in English. Will explore the intersection of Modernism and Postmodernism, as well as the place of the written word in a world increasingly dominated by mass communication: radio, television, and the advertising image. Authors may include Greene, Lessing, Pinter, Barker, Murdoch, Stoppard, and Rushdie.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2904 or permission of instructor and FYS 1104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3504 - The Eighteenth-Century British Novel


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the novel’s beginnings and rapid development in Britain, with special attention to such topics as the rise of literacy, the respectability of writing fiction, and special forms of the novel. Authors may include Defoe, Sterne, Fielding, Richardson, and Austen.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3514 - The Nineteenth-Century British Novel


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the major novelists of the nineteenth century. Though individual works may vary between offerings of the course, authors will include such writers as Scott, E. Bronte, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3564 - Milton


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An intensive study of the most important poetry and selected prose of the major seventeenth-century British writer, focusing on Paradise Lost.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3664 - Early Twentieth-Century American Literature


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of North American literature from the turn of the century to World War II. Includes an examination of the Modernist movement and the Harlem Renaissance as well as the work of other influential authors. Reading may include works by Sherwood Anderson, Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, ee cummings, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Charlotte Perkins- Gilman, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, and Richard Wright.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 3674 - Twentieth-Century American Literature, Post-1945


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of North American literature from 1945 to the present, with special emphasis on the exploration of cultural issues in traditional, multicultural, and feminist literatures. Reading may include the works of Margaret Atwood, James Baldwin, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Joan Didion, E. L. Doctorow, Ralph Ellison, Louise Erdrich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Flannery O’Connor, Thomas Pynchon, J. D. Salinger, Sam Shepard, Tennessee Williams, and George Wolfe.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV; V
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2674 , ENG 2474 , or ENG 2484  and FYS 1104  or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4014 - Independent Study


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Readings on an approved topic, followed by the preparation of a critical paper. Repeatable once by special permission.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Grade point average of at least 30
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4144 - Senior Creative Writing Project


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Full-year independent study project in creative writing. Emphasis may be on poetry, fiction, or drama and will vary with student interest and availability of instructor. Student is expected to research the craft and produce an organized, book-length manuscript.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, at least one term of WRC 2074 /ENG 2074  or WRC 2084 /ENG 2084 , or permission of instructor ENG 4144 is a prerequisite to ENG 4154  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4154 - Senior Creative Writing Project


    2 Course Unit(s)
    Full-year independent study project in creative writing. Emphasis may be on poetry, fiction, or drama and will vary with student interest and availability of instructor. Student is expected to research the craft and produce an organized, book-length manuscript.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, at least one term of WRC 2074 /ENG 2074  or WRC 2084 /ENG 2084 , or permission of instructor ENG 4144  is a prerequisite to 4154
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4204 - Internship in English


    1 Course Unit(s)
    The practical application of English skills in journalism, communications, advertising, and other areas. Students choose an appropriate organization in consultation with faculty sponsor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the major and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4208 - Internship in English


    2 Course Unit(s)
    The practical application of English skills in journalism, communications, advertising, and other areas. Students choose an appropriate organization in consultation with faculty sponsor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the major and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENG 4504 - Capstone Seminar


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Designed to encourage students to engage more deeply with questions that arise from the study of literature, as well as provide occasion for students to reflect on work done throughout the major. It will, in addition, require that students complete an extended critical essay. Focal literary works will be drawn from a specific historical period and will change from term to term, depending upon the instructor. Required of all English majors in the winter of their senior year.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of three period-requirement courses, and senior standing in the major
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None

Environmental Studies

  
  •  

    ENVS 1024 - Environmental Science


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A broad overview of the structure and function of environmental systems and the impact of human cultures on these systems. The complexity and multidisciplinary nature of environmental issues involving, for example, population growth, air and water pollution, biogeochemical cycles, and energy demands and alternatives are considered, but emphasis will be placed on our scientific knowledge of these issues. Lecture and laboratory.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Natural Science
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENVS 3072 - Environmental Studies Research


    1/2 Course Unit(s)
    For students who wish to devise a research project that crosses disciplines to explore issues of environmental significance. Students need to arrange for guidance from more than one faculty member. Students may register for up to two half-credit projects.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, ENVS 1024 , and completion of at least two other courses toward the Environmental Studies minor, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENVS 3074 - Environmental Studies Research


    1 Course Unit(s)
    For students who wish to devise a research project that crosses disciplines to explore issues of environmental significance. Students need to arrange for guidance from more than one faculty member. Students may register for up to two half-credit projects.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, ENVS 1024 , and completion of at least two other courses toward the Environmental Studies minor, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENVS 3204 - Environmental Studies Internship


    1 Course Unit(s)
    For students engaging in an internship that requires work that cannot be classified as contributing to a single disciplinary major.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, completion of at least two courses for the Environmental Studies minor, or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    ENVS 4004 - Environmental Studies Senior Project


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Offered to students who plan to enter graduate programs or careers in environmental fields, this course involves independent study of environmental issues under the guidance of professors from various disciplines. It requires students to draw on more than one discipline while analyzing case studies, developing critical bibliographies, writing a substantial research essay, and making a public presentation. Application needs to be made to the Environmental Studies Committee chair in the term prior to anticipated enrollment.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, completion of coursework for the environmental studies minor, and permission of Environmental Studies Minor Committee
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None

Health and Exercise Science

  
  •  

    HES 1004 - Introduction to Exercise Science


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introduction to the history, methods, and philosophy of exercise science as a discipline. This course should be taken in the first or second year.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 1114 - Health and Wellness


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An exploration of the concepts of wellness, fitness, and health and how lifestyle factors
    impact quality of life. Includes components of physical fitness, optimal nutrition, prevention of chronic disease, emotional wellness, and stress management. First-year and sophomore students only. 

    General Education Requirement(s):
  
  •  

    HES 2004 - Health Promotion


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Introduction to a range of topics related to the health of the individual. Areas of specific emphasis include nutrition and weight management, stress management, substance abuse, and aging.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): HES 1113  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 2014 - Women’s Health


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as WGS 2024 .
    This course will explore the social, political and cultural issues impacting women’s health and the special health needs of women across the lifespan. Students will discuss the relationship of women, both as consumers and practitioners, to the health care system and will research the health behaviors unique to women to achieve and maintain wellness and to prevent chronic disease.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 2024 - Public Health


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An introduction to the rationale, history and development of public health in the U.S. and globally. Emphasis is placed on underlying theories and the scientific and social bases for public health practice, plus the impact of critical public health concerns on society. Professional disciplines, organizations, and methods that interact to improve the public’s health are addressed.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 2094 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as BIO 2014 .
    An introductory consideration of the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and cardiovascular systems with particular reference to the human. This course is designed for exercise science majors and students considering an allied health career. It will not count toward the major course requirement of the biology pattern. Lecture and laboratory.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): HES 1004 , Exercise Science major or permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 2104 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Also listed as BIO 2104 .
    An introductory consideration of the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems with particular reference to the human. This course is designed for Exercise Science majors and other students interested in an allied health career. It will not count toward the major course requirements of the biology pattern. Lecture and laboratory.

    General Education Requirement(s): IV
    Prerequisite(s): HES 2094  or BIO 2014  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 2294 - Special Topics in Health and Exercise Science


    1 Course Unit(s)
    The study of a topic or inquiry not fully treated in other courses. Topics may include nutrition and human performance, weight management, exercise testing for normal and special populations, or other allied health areas. Subjects change and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit if topic is different.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 3014 - Physiology of Exercise


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the human anatomical systems and their physiological function with special emphasis on the muscular, nervous, skeletal, circulatory, and respiratory systems and the acute and chronic adaptations that result from exercise. Additional topics may include bioenergetics, body composition, and environmental influences on exercise performance. Laboratory component required.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2014 /HES 2094  and BIO 2104 /HES 2104  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 3034 - Injuries and Rehabilitation


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Develops awareness of the injury problems associated with physical activity participation and activities of daily living. Teaches methods of prevention and rehabilitation of musculoskeltal injuries. Introduces the therapy modalities available to rehabilitation professionals. Skills and certification in CPR/AED and First Aid will be taught.  A lab component is required.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2014  or HES 2094  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 3054 - Biomechanics


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Biological and mechanical principles of movement patterns and their application to the evaluation of both the performer and the performance. This course includes a lab component.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2014 HES 2094 , or PHYS 2115   
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 3204 - Nutrition and Energy Balance


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of evidence-based information on major nutrients and nutritional needs across the lifespan. Explores basic concepts that govern energy balance, body composition, and weight management. Other topics include the relationship between nutrition and physical performance and disease prevention, the factors that affect food choices—including media and advertising, and the sustainability of our food system.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): HES 1004  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4004 - Organization, Administration, and Evaluation of Exercise Science


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Explores concepts of administration, supervision, and evaluation of exercise science programs.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): HES 1004  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4014 - The Life of a Muscle


    1 Course Unit(s)
    An in-depth examination of muscle physiology across the lifespan. Topics may include muscle development, metabolic adaptations to training, muscle hypertrophy, muscle diseases, spaceflight and aging-associated atrophy.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): HES 3014  
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4204 - Internship


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Supervised placement of students in organizations that provide capstone experiences for the Exercise Science major. Integrating theory and practice, this experience includes academic requirements, such as reports and research papers, which will be agreed upon in advance among the student, faculty, and placement supervisor by means of a learning contract. May be repeated once for credit. CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2104  or HES 2104  and permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4212 - Independent Study


    1/2 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the tools and techniques of research, the use of the library for literature review, and the planning and execution of a research project, with a written report. May be repeated for a total of 2 units of credit. 4212 is CR/NC grading only. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4214 - Independent Study


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A study of the tools and techniques of research, the use of the library for literature review, and the planning and execution of a research project, with a written report. May be repeated for a total of 2 units of credit. Standard or CR/NC grading.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
  
  •  

    HES 4444 - Senior Seminar


    1 Course Unit(s)
    Topics include current trends and research methods in exercise science and the allied health field. Team research projects provide the opportunity to integrate previous coursework and to explore new questions.

    General Education Requirement(s):
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None

Fine Arts

  
  •  

    FA 1004 - Introduction to the Fine Arts


    1 Course Unit(s)
    A survey of basic ideas, guiding principles, and historical and contemporary practices in art, drama, and music. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the creative process, analyzing various works of art, developing critical tools for appreciation, perceiving the relationships among the three art forms, and comprehending fundamental issues in the representation of reality through art. Travel to artistic events will occur as part of the course when available.

    General Education Requirement(s): II Fine Arts
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): None
    Pre/Corequisite(s): None
 

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